Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Waiting On . .

This Wednesday We Have Our Eyes On . . . 

Once We Were
Hybrid Chronicles #2
Kat Zhang
Harper Collins
Releases: 9.17.2013

Review Bk #1 : REVIEW

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Blurb From Publisher:

Eva was never supposed to have survived this long. As the recessive soul, she should have faded away years ago. Instead, she lingers in the body she shares with her sister soul, Addie. When the government discovered the truth, they tried to “cure” the girls, but Eva and Addie escaped before the doctors could strip Eva’s soul away.
Now fugitives, Eva and Addie find shelter with a group of hybrids who run an underground resistance. Surrounded by others like them, the girls learn how to temporarily disappear to give each soul some much-needed privacy. Eva is thrilled at the chance to be alone with Ryan, the boy she’s falling for, but troubled by the growing chasm between her and Addie. Despite clashes over their shared body, both girls are eager to join the rebellion.
Yet as they are drawn deeper into the escalating violence, they start to wonder: How far are they willing to go to fight for hybrid freedom? Faced with uncertainty and incredible danger, their answers may tear them apart forever.

Across A Star Swept Sea
Diana Peterfreund
Releases 9.25.2013
Balzer & Bray

Blurb From The Publisher:

This companion novel to the critically acclaimed For Darkness Shows the Stars is a thrilling futuristic retelling of the classic spy novel The Scarlet Pimpernel.
Centuries after wars nearly destroyed civilization, the two islands of New Pacifica stand alone, a paradise where even the Reduction-the devastating brain disorder that sparked the wars-is a distant memory. Yet on the isle of Galatea, an uprising against the aristocracy has turned deadly. The revolutionaries' weapon is a drug that damages their enemies' brains, and the only hope is rescue by a mysterious spy known as the Wild Poppy.
On neighboring Albion, no one suspects that the Wild Poppy is actually famously frivolous teenage aristocrat Persis Blake. Her gossipy flutternotes are encrypted plans, her pampered sea mink is genetically engineered for spying, and her well-publicized new romance with handsome Galatean medic Justen her most dangerous mission ever.
Justen is hiding things, too-his disenchantment with his country's revolution, his undeniable attraction to the silly socialite he's pretending to love. Persis is also falling for Justen, but when she discovers his greatest secret-one that could plunge New Pacifica into another dark age-Persis realizes she's not just risking her heart, she's risking the world she's sworn to protect.
Inspired by The Scarlet Pimpernel, Across a Star-Swept Sea is a thrilling adventure in which nothing is as it seems and two teens from different worlds must fight for a future only they dare to imagine.

Dance Of The Red Death
Bethany Griffin
Releases 5.21.13
Greenwillow Books

Blurb From The Publisher:

The sequel to Masque of the Red Death, which Melissa Marr called "Haunting and beautiful." Araby Worth is poised either to save her city, or to abandon it. In a novel that embodies everything that's dark, sexy, tragic, and fearless, Bethany Griffin concludes her incredible, atmospheric reimagining of Edgar Allan Poe's classic short story.
Araby Worth's city is on fire. Her brother is dead. Her best friend could be dead soon. Her mother is a prisoner; her father is in hiding. And the two boys who stole her heart have both betrayed her. But Araby has found herself, and she is going to fight back. Inspired by one of Edgar Allan Poe's most compelling stories, "The Masque of the Red Death," Bethany Griffin has spun two sultry and intricate novels about a young woman who finds herself on the brink of despair but refuses to give in. Decadent masquerades, steamy stolen moments, and sweeping action are set in a city crumbling from neglect and tragedy. A city that seeps into your skin. Dance of the Red Death is the riveting conclusion to the dark and fascinating saga of an unforgettable heroine.

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